Cultivating Digital Citizenship 

It’s the beginning of another school year. We’ve had the pleasure of meeting many of you while assisting with implementing your ebook platforms. Feel free to touch base with us if you have further questions. We are here to make your life easier.

In last month’s newsletter, we talked about the importance of developing critical online research skills to be able to decipher fact from fiction – weeding out the fake news!

This month we’re addressing something that’s equally, if not more important, Digital Citizenship. Research from stopbullying.gov shows that among U.S. teens who use social media, 88% experience, or witness mean or cruel behavior, 67% observe others participating in those negative behaviors, and 21% admit to joining in at least once in a while.

These statistics need to be turned around. Cultivating digital citizenship skills is essential for all of us to thrive in today’s increasingly tech-driven world. While tech savviness seems to be an inherent trait, digital citizens aren’t born – they’re taught by teachers like you!

Take a few moments to read this newsletter. And, once again, don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions about your digital needs!

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Founder & CEO

6 Rules of Digital Citizenship 

Our kids are digital natives, they’ve grown up in the digital age. They are exposed to and use digital devices from a very early age. But just because they have been the home IT expert since first grade and can play the latest and greatest video games like a champ – doesn’t mean they don’t have a lot to learn about digital conduct.

If anything, their agility (and comfort) on the internet is all the more reason to teach them how to be good digital citizens.

Taking the time to instill digital responsibility at an early age is crucial for our students as they move forward from playground friendship to Facebook friends. The lessons aren’t new concepts. They complement what we are already teaching students about how to behave throughout their lives, as well as ensure a safer, healthier, digital footprint.

  Think:

A practice that we should all 
whether communicating
face-to-face or online can be 
remembered with a simple
acronym: THINK

T – True: Is this fact or just an opinion?

H – Helpful: Does it help you, them or the situation?

I – Inspiring: Does it inspire and motivate you?

N – Necessary: Would this be better left unsaid?

K – Kind: What is your motivation for communicating?

Here are the 6 Rules of Digital Citizenship:

1. No Cyberbullying
Not only should people be good citizens in reality, but they should be digitally as well. Either in person or online never bully, troll, make fun of, or harass people. Cyberbullying remains a huge issue in today’s digital society. It’s critical to teach students how to behave respectfully online as well as how to respond if they become the target of a cyberbully or if they are otherwise the target of hurtful behaviors.

2. Never Give Out Personal Information
Not only should people be good citizens in reality, but they should be digitally as well. Either in person or online never bully, troll, make fun of, or harass people. Cyberbullying remains a huge issue in today’s digital society. It’s critical to teach students how to behave respectfully online as well as how to respond if they become the target of a cyberbully or if they are otherwise the target of hurtful behaviors.

3. Maintain Internet Personal Safety
Protecting your online privacy is a fundamental part of staying safe on the Internet. A big part of this is being able to tell when someone else’s behavior is inappropriate and taking the necessary action to stop it.

4. Privacy and Security is Vital
While there are security programs and privacy settings that can help block things like computer viruses and protect your online privacy. Starting at an early age, kids should learn about how important it is to ask for permission before creating an account or downloading a file, for example. By developing skills about privacy and safety on the Internet, kids lay a strong foundation for the rest of their digital lives.

5. Digital Footprints and Reputation
It’s vital to be aware of the footprint you’re leaving online and how it could potentially come back to haunt you later on. Respect the privacy of others online when tagging, posting, or copying personal information.

6. Creative Credit and Copyright
Giving credit for someone else’s creations is a very important part of digital citizenship. It’s important to know about the rights to copyrighted work, how to identify copyrighted work that isn’t in the public domain, how to know what constitutes fair use, and what piracy and plagiarism are along with the consequences of them.

Does Classroom Design Affect Learning? Yes!

With all the talk about how workplace design affects productivity, it only makes sense that the same principals apply to our students’ learning space. No longer are the days of rows of desks, fluorescent lighting, and stark, “beige-ish” walls!

A 2015 study by the Building and Environment journal found that classroom design affects a student’s academic progress over an academic year by 25% in either direction – positive or negative.

The difference between the best- and worst-designed classrooms accounted for a full year’s worth of academic progress.

In a nutshell, all aspects of classroom design make a difference to the space’s ambiance and the learning environment students walk into each day. Want to make an impact in your classroom? These design details have the strongest impact and can yield the best results without a complete overhaul of existing furniture and fixtures in a classroom.

  • Air Quality – Good air quality and comfortable room temperatures improved student progress by 28%.
  • Color Providing enough visual stimulation around the classroom through the use of color on walls, floors, and furniture
  • Choice – Quality furniture including interesting and ergonomic tables and chairs that support a sense of ownership
  • Complexity – Providing novel surroundings and attention-grabbing décor in balance with orderliness
  • Flexibility – The ability of a classroom to accommodate students without crowding them, along with how easily furniture can be rearranged to support a variety of activities and teaching approaches.
  • Light – Quality, and quantity of natural light, and degree of control with the level of lighting

See What One High School Principal Had to Say About Working with EdTech 

Let Us Show You How Simple It Is

Call us today at 844-501-7851 to learn more, or schedule a demo with our implementation experts, or use the button below:

2402 S Rural Rd, #201 Tempe, AZ 85282 | EdTechSoftware.com | Shelfit.com | 844-501-7851